Hi, this is my site.  Sorry I have been away for some time; life kind of got in the way.

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I got re-married and my wife and I are expecting our first child in a few months. I have also relocated a few times.

However, you can follow me here:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CASpears1 – here I talk about whatever interests me, mostly China, the Greater China Cultural Sphere.  I will talk more about population genetics in the future.

Quora: https://www.quora.com/profile/Collin-Spears-1 – I spend a lot of time talking about population genetics and China.

By-the-way, something I never shared before,

I interviewed the former Uighur leader on CSPAN in a panel, in 2007. The first Uighur I met, who told me about these things was in China in 1999, when I was an exchange student. I’m not new to this, and this did not start recently, Xi Jinping just escalated things beyond all reason in the last couple of years.

The CSPAN video is up,

You can see the video here:

https://www.c-span.org/video/?288649-1/dragon-fighter

I asked questions at these times:

40:30

54:47

I also had “15 minutes of Fame” in Korea, because of this blog, about 45 minutes into the show I was interviewed, but I can no longer find it online.

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Average Spaniard Male

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Average Spaniard Female

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Average Saudi Male

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Dragon Fighter
Dragon Fighter

The People’s Republic of China has 56 recognized ethnicities; still, the Han majority makes up 92 percent of the population.  Most of the remaining 55 groups are relatively unknown to the West.  Some are even little known in China, as they are small and live on the margins of China-proper.  Groups such as the ethnic Koreans and Manchu are highly integrated into the Chinese mainstream; however, the best known internationally, the Tibetans, are recognized mainly due to their protracted struggle for greater autonomy from the oppressive Han dominated national government.

In fact, the level of international awareness Tibetans receive is astonishing, considering Tibetans make up less than half of one percent of China’s population.  This makes them only the ninth largest minority group.  The “Tibetan Issue” is well known due to a superior global marketing campaign, which includes the venerable Dalai Lama and a host of celebrity Western activists.  However, the 10 million Uighurs (also Uyghur) in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region are more numerous, have struggled just as long against the Han Chinese, and their homeland is larger.  Still, they have never enjoyed the same international regard.  Perhaps, Turkic Muslims are not as appealing to the hearts and minds of the West as bald monks in flowing robes.  Cultural biases aside, the Uighurs have failed at marketing, largely because they have no central leadership, no figurehead – until now.

Enter the Dragon Fighter: Rebiya Kadeer, the self declared “Mother Of All Uighurs”.  Once, one of the wealthiest women in China, this slight mother of 11 children, divorcee, non-secondary school graduate, is one of China’s most wanted fugitives.  The government has accused her of working with foreign interests to mastermind the July 5th Uighur protest that turned into a violent race riot.  Over 200 people are believed to have died, most of whom were ethnic Han, who many Uighurs view as colonists.

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The latest article is now up at Brooks Foreign Policy Review, here.

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), founded 42 years ago, was created to provide a framework to advance regional stability in Southeast Asia at a time when the withdrawal of colonial powers had created a vacuum. This placed the newly independent states of the region in danger of succumbing to ethnic strife and communist insurgencies. Since the conclusion of the Cold War, ASEAN has embarked on a series of free trade initiatives, linking it to some of the Asian-Pacific regions most dynamic economies.

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Article is also up at Brooks Foreign Policy Review, here.

In 2001, Former Singaporean Ambassador to the United Nations, Kishore Mahbubani asked a simple question, which was also the title of his book, “Can Asians Think?” Mr. Mahbubani sought to challenge, what he perceived as, Western paternalism. He believes that Asians do not need indefinite guidance by the Western world, because Asians are capable of independent thought, and just because these thoughts may differ from the West does not mean they are the result of defective thinking. A befitting question for the coming decade is, “Can Sub-Saharan Africans think?” For many Westerners it would seem the answer is, “No”, at least as far as Africa’s relationship with China.

In 2005, the Western media began to express “concern” with the increasing Chinese presence in Sub-Sahara Africa (Africa). During this period, many foreign policy observers began to promote the idea that China is plotting to take over Africa in some neo-colonialist attempt to gain unlimited access to natural resources. For example, Karin Kortmann, a German parliamentary state secretary stated in November of 2006, “our African partners really have to watch out that they will not be facing a new process of colonization” (Cheng 2007). The same year, Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, Jack Straw, made similar allegations “Most of what China has been doing in Africa today is what we did in Africa 150 years ago” (Stevenson 2006). This Sinophobic boilerplate is hyperbole, but the narrative suggests that the average African is impotent and their leaders are all iniquitous or ineffectual.

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